Bombast: Spinning Atoms in the Desert

Atomic Nevada: Deceptive is a scary word, especially with hesitation rising about government roles.  Since the start of the Atomic Era in the mid-1940s, the state of Nevada has lived with more than its share of misdirection, with senior figures in the military, tame politicians, scientific boffins, dismissive journalists, and government officials routinely bowing before the nuclear genie.  This book is for those interested in how and why manipulated language and imagery doled out by the atomic industry become parts of our lives.

Bombast: Spinning Atoms in the Desert

The Black Rock (Desert), lecture and book signing by Peter Goin

November 21, 2013: 6:30 – 8:00 pm at the Nevada State Museum in Carson City, NV. 

Frances Humphrey Lecture Series: The Black Rock (Desert), lecture and book signing by Peter Goin, Foundation Professor of Art in Photography and Videography at the University of Nevada, Reno.  black_rock_cover

Nevada State Museum
600 North Carson Street
Carson City, Nevada 89701-4004

Admission: $8 for adults; free for museum members and children 17 and under. Doors open at 6 pm.  

July 5th – Mackedon to present at Mensa Annual Gathering

Mensa 2012 Annual Gathering in Reno, Nevada

PROGRAM NAME: Nuclear Propaganda in the American West

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: Drawing on research undertaken while writing Bombast: Spinning Atoms in the Desert, Mackedon will explore ways in which Orwellian imagery has been implemented by nuclear agencies and industries to marginalize populations living in the shadow of nuclear projects and to disguise the dangers of atomic testing and permanent high level nuclear waste disposal in the American West. The talk will be accompanied by slides of atomic testing and include descriptions of instances where specific propaganda tropes were and still are used to mollify or intimidate affected populations.

SPEAKER NAME(S): Michon Mackedon

SPEAKER BIO:

MICHON MACKEDON: Michon Mackedon is professor emerita, English and humanities, Western Nevada College. For 22 years, she served as vice chairman of the Nevada Commission on Nuclear Projects. Her recently published book, Bombast: Spinning Atoms in the Desert (Reno: Black Rock Institute Press, 2010) has won multiple awards, including the Foreword Review Book of the Year in Regional Non-fiction. Mackedon and her husband, Michael, live in Fallon, Nevada, where they raised their four children.

Scheduled for:

DATE: Thursday, 07/05/2012

START TIME: 10:30 AM

END TIME: 11:45 AM

Sagebrush Conversations

Where the Sage Meets the Sky: Great Basin Landscapes

Wednesday, March 7, 3 – 5 p.m.

Nevada Today, Events @ Nevada. In conjunction with the current Special Collections exhibit Where the Sage Meets the Sky: Great Basin Landscapes, join us for a series of “Sagebrush Conversations” as local experts and authors discuss Nevada’s physical and cultural environment. Discussions on this date will be on “Photographing and Mapping the Black Rock Desert” with Peter Goin, UNR Professor & Chair, Art Dept., and Paul Starrs, UNR Professor & Chair, Geography Dept.

Peter Goin and Paul Starrs co-authored Black Rock in 2005, each bringing to the volume their professional strengths.  Peter will discuss his photography for the book and Paul will cover the geography of this most historically important northern Nevada desert.

Michon Mackedon Signs Bombast: Spinning Atoms in the Desert

Author Event at Barnes & Noble in Reno, Nevada

Bombast: Spinning Atoms in the Desert is a crucial linchpin in Atomic Revival studies. Michon Mackedon recounts Nevada’s relationship with the nuclear industry. Please join us today and meet the author. This is a beautiful book with striking photos!
Saturday November 26, 2011 2:00 PM 

Author examines how Nevada became Ground Zero of nuclear testing

Review written by: Susan Skorupa – Reno Gazette-Journal

Events in the 1950s and the 1980s concerning the nation’s nuclear future produced redundant journeys.

Both searches led seekers to Nevada (Nye County, specifically) first to what became the Nevada Test Site north of Las Vegas as a place to detonate nuclear weapons — from 1950 through 1992, more than 1,000 nuclear detonations were conducted above and under Nevada — and in 1987, to Yucca Mountain as a location on the test site to bury nuclear waste.

The journeys and their outcomes also created similar chains of rhetoric, press coverage, publicity and other responses that more than 60 years after the start of the nuclear age in Nevada has left the nation and the world with a stereotypical view of Nevadans and their world. That impression has propagated the notion of Nevada as wasteland and its people stereotypically as outsiders and loners, outlaws, gamblers and desert rats, oblivious to or uncaring about nuclear bombs and waste.

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